Organizations – Ruth Dilts Design http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 20:08:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1.png Organizations – Ruth Dilts Design http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/ 32 32 Colorado Springs Area Pet Organizations Begin September 25 | Calendar events http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-area-pet-organizations-begin-september-25-calendar-events/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-area-pet-organizations-begin-september-25-calendar-events/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 18:00:00 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-area-pet-organizations-begin-september-25-calendar-events/ EVENTS OCT. 4-9 Chihuahua-Small Dog Rescue Virtual Sweet 16 Party Auctions – Silent auction from October 4 to 9, with live auction from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. October 9. Registration required: betterunite.com/ chihuahua-smalldogrescue sweet16party. OCT. 9 Fur ball – Benefiting the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region, 6 to 9:30 p.m., DoubleTree by […]]]>

EVENTS

OCT. 4-9

Chihuahua-Small Dog Rescue Virtual Sweet 16 Party Auctions – Silent auction from October 4 to 9, with live auction from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. October 9. Registration required: betterunite.com/ chihuahua-smalldogrescue sweet16party.

OCT. 9

Fur ball – Benefiting the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region, 6 to 9:30 p.m., DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel, 1775 E. Cheyenne Mountain Blvd. Go online for ticket prices. Registration required: hsppr.org/events/fur-ball-2021.

Sweet 16 Party – Benefiting Chihuahua & Small Dog Rescue, 6 to 9:30 p.m., Colorado Springs Masonic Hall, 1150 Panorama Drive, $ 35 to $ 50. Registration required: tinyurl.com/eets4fb5.

OCT. ten

Animal blessing – 3:00 p.m., parking lot at St. Matthias Episcopal Church, Monument 18320 Furrow Road. Donations of non-perishable food will be collected for the benefit of Tri-Lakes Cares; stmatthias@comcast.net ..

NEED HELP?

Harley’s Hope Foundation – Provides financial assistance for major veterinary care and behavior modification services, access to a list of Colorado animal care resources, and educational information on preventative care and animal safety: harleys-hopefoundation.org, 495-6083.

AVAILABLE

Safe place for pets – Find homes for the pets of terminally ill owners. For more information on animal placement or to find animals available for adoption, call 359-0201 or go to safeplacepets.org.

Adopt a pet shelter license plates – One-time fee of $ 80 for new or replacement plates in addition to other taxes and fees, renewal fee of $ 25. Part of the funds go to the Pet Overpopulation Fund; colorado.gov.

LOOKING TO HELP?

9-Rescue of Lives Inc. – Foster homes required. Medical supplies and care provided; 591-4640; colorado9lives.com.

Breeder Release Adoption Service – Donations of money, food, collars and harnesses for dogs accepted; breederadoptions.org.

Happy cats paradise – Need for volunteer cleaners and adoption assistance as well as donations of Costco gift cards, groceries and office supplies; lightly used cat equipment accepted; 362-4600, happycatshaven.org.

See what the cat brought – Volunteers for shelter duties and foster families for wanted kittens and cats, 2129 E. Boulder St .; 331-6852, lookwhatthecatbroughtin.org.

Rocky Mountain Cocker Spaniel Rescue – Volunteers and host families wanted; rockymountaincockerrescue.org.

WHAT TO DO IF ?

If an animal bites you, if your animal runs away, or if you find a stray animal, call Humane Society of the Pikes Peak area, 473-1741. To list a lost or found pet, go to hsppr.org.

Email adoption fairs and pet events to tolistings@gazette.com.


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Local Organizations Receive Funding – The Troy Messenger http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/local-organizations-receive-funding-the-troy-messenger/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/local-organizations-receive-funding-the-troy-messenger/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 04:38:02 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/local-organizations-receive-funding-the-troy-messenger/ At its September quarterly meeting in Jasper, the Alabama State Council on the Arts awarded 219 grants totaling $ 3,667,300 to arts organizations in communities across the state. The grants were in response to applications submitted to the Alabama Arts Recovery Program and the Alabama State Council on the Arts grant cycle that ended on […]]]>

At its September quarterly meeting in Jasper, the Alabama State Council on the Arts awarded 219 grants totaling $ 3,667,300 to arts organizations in communities across the state.

The grants were in response to applications submitted to the Alabama Arts Recovery Program and the Alabama State Council on the Arts grant cycle that ended on June 1, 2021.

Four arts organizations in Pike County received a grant from ASCA totaling $ 29,600.

The Troy-Pike Cultural Arts Center received $ 22.00; Troy University received $ 2,500; the Pioneer Museum of Alabama received $ 2,900; and the Brundidge Historical Society received $ 1,200.

Brenda Campbell, director of the Johnson Center for the Arts, expressed her gratitude on behalf of the Troy-Pike Cultural Arts Center for the grant funds that will be used to support the Troy Town & Gown Series and Center Stagers. The arts center grant funds also included an Alabama Arts Recovery Grant.

“We cannot thank ASCA enough for their support over the years and, especially during the pandemic,” Campbell said. “Grant funds make programming that would not otherwise be possible. “

Campbell said the Town and Gown series will include an opera workshop and performances at the Studio, including the POPulus and Frequency musical ensemble and three workshops at Troy University Studio.

“We are extremely proud of the Town and Gown relationship that the Johnson Center for the Arts has with Troy University,” said Campbell. “The relationship allows us to offer a variety of artistic opportunities that bring the two communities together.

Center Stages is a youth theater and dance program run by Tori Lee Averett, Theater Education Coordinator at Troy University.

“The theater and dance program provides an opportunity for classroom instruction and also for performances,” said Campbell. “This is a unique program that would not be possible without the ASCA grant.

Carrie Jaxon, curator of the International Arts Center at the University of Troy, said ASCA’s support is important for the on-campus opportunities offered by the University of Troy to young students.

“The Junior Warriors program was implemented before COVID and we appreciate ASCA’s support to make it a reality for fifth-graders in schools across the city. Jaxon said. “Junior Warriors brings students on campus to participate in a workshop led by arts education students from the University of Troy. “

Young students visit the IAC and see the gallery exhibits. They also visit the Confucius Institute and have lunch at Trojan Dining.

“A lot of the students, who live here in Troy, have never been to campus,” Jaxon said. “Junior Warriors offers an artistic experience and the opportunity to discover the university of their hometown. “

Barbara Tatom, director of the Pioneer Museum of Alabama, also thanked ASCA for its support of the museum’s programming and, more recently, the Pioneer Days, which is a two-day living history event.

“We are more than grateful for the grant and continued support from ASCAs,” Tatom said. “Pioneer Days is our annual two-day event and brings people of all ages together at the museum. Demonstrations include folk arts and rope making, woodworking, blacksmithing, and fabric dyeing, to name a few. The re-enactments depict various periods in Pike County’s history, including the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the American Civil War period. The Pioneer Days are an opportunity for visitors to visit the museum and the buildings on the grounds. It is a great moment of learning and pleasure.

Anne Register, program coordinator for the Brundidge Historical Society, said the ASCA grant allows the BHS to reopen the doors of the We Piddle Around Theater.

“We have had to cancel all of our events since January 2020, so we cannot express what this grant means,” Register said. “Josh Goforth will be the star performer at our Christmas event in Chile Country. He’s a talented storyteller and musician, who has appeared at the Grand Ole Opry, Carnegie Hall and everywhere in between. We thank ASCA for the opportunity to open our doors once again and for their long-standing support of “Come Home, It’s Suppertime,” our original folk drama, the Pike Piddlers Storytelling Festival and the many others. events from our historic We Piddle Around Theater. “

The Alabama State Council on the Art (ASCA) has supported Alabama’s arts throughout the pandemic and the cultural sector through its grants, said Dr. Elliot Knight, executive director of the council.

“As arts organizations statewide reopen and safely return to in-person operations, we continue to support recovery through the Alabama Arts Recovery Program,” he said.


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Young veterans organization takes on challenges in Philadelphia neighborhoods http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/young-veterans-organization-takes-on-challenges-in-philadelphia-neighborhoods/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/young-veterans-organization-takes-on-challenges-in-philadelphia-neighborhoods/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 13:07:30 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/young-veterans-organization-takes-on-challenges-in-philadelphia-neighborhoods/ When Matt Miclette and nine other young men and women dined together in Center City on Veterans Day in 2016, they had more than military service in common. They were graduating, building careers, starting families, and feeling the need to do more. From the conversations around the table that evening at Fogo de Chão Brazilian […]]]>

When Matt Miclette and nine other young men and women dined together in Center City on Veterans Day in 2016, they had more than military service in common. They were graduating, building careers, starting families, and feeling the need to do more.

From the conversations around the table that evening at Fogo de Chão Brazilian Steakhouse emerged an organization that taps into the talent, spirit and ambitions of a new generation of American veterans. It’s called Action Tank (actiontank.us) for good reason.

“Our first service project was to clean up a park in South Philly,” said Miclette, 33, an army veteran, registered nurse and executive director of Action Tank. “It started with putting us on the ground and doing an act of service. “

Said Darrell Wisseman, 32, a Glenside resident who served in the Marine Corps and is a graduate student at Arcadia University: “Action Tank is the antithesis of a think tank because we are not seated in an ivory tower. We are in the streets to do good for the community.

The 20 young veterans from across the Philadelphia area who make up the Action Tank plant trees, harvest potatoes and distribute food. They volunteer at Hope Center for people experiencing homelessness, and with Prevention point, the organization that seeks to minimize harm to drug addicts disorder. Action Tank is allied with two dozen frontline organizations across town, from Moms ask for action to the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.

“Our role is to support nonprofits that are already doing a great job,” said Miclette, who lives at Point Breeze.

“We don’t come trying to be the experts,” said Emily Balog, Air Force veteran, graduate student and assistant professor at Rutgers University Camden.

“We provide our partner organizations with high level planning and thinking, and field starts,” said Balog, 37, of Stratford, NJ. “No conditions.”

Members of the Action Tank give inspiration to the Tillman Foundation and its mission of selfless service. The foundation offers leadership development and scholarship programs for veterans and their spouses and honors the legacy of Pat tillman, the professional football player who put his NFL career on hold and joined the US military after the 9/11 attacks.

Tillman died, aged 27, after being shot dead by friendly fire while serving in combat in Afghanistan in 2004. Miclette, Balog, Founding Member Chris Diaz, and member Daris McInnis are all Tillman Fellows playing a key role in Action Tank.

“We were supposed to meet in Arizona for a Tillman Foundation national service project and a 9/11 souvenir, but it had to be canceled due to the [COVID-19] delta variant, ”Balog said. “Tillman is providing funds to local academics to carry out a project, and we really want to do something to support the Afghan refugees. So we’re looking to see how we can do it. “

Diaz, an army vet who hosted the founding dinner in 2016 (“there was such energy at this table”) was the first Executive Director of Action Tank. He said the group contrasts with an all too common public perception that veterans are either heroic or tragic.

“We just want to use our skills to build the community,” said Diaz, a 39-year-old Northwest Philly resident.

These skills include the same type of research, data analysis, political, administrative and managerial expertise involved in creating and maintaining the Action Tank itself.

“We decide what [issue] we want to focus on each year, learn more, create partnerships and share knowledge, ”said Miclette. “The first issue we focused on was the opioid crisis, but as we expand our portfolio we are not letting go. [existing commitments] behind.”

In addition to the opioid crisis, Action Tank is also working on food insecurity, gun violence and restore the tree canopy of Philadelphia.

“I was extremely impressed with the amount of research they did,” said Erica Smith Fichman, community forestry manager for the city. Department of Parks and Recreation. “I see their volunteers everywhere. It’s awesome.

Onika Washington-Johnson, who manages volunteers for the Share the food program of Philadelphia, said she was struck by Action Tank’s “general sense of commitment” to the fight against hunger.

“They do a lot of work on our urban farm,” she said. “They bring a dynamic spirit. “

A 35-year-old city resident and military veteran, McInnis joined Action Tank in February. He liked what he heard about the group’s commitment to service – and wanted to work on community projects alongside other veterans.

“Action Tank is an opportunity to do something tangible,” said McInnis, who teaches literacy classes at West Chester University and is also pursuing a doctorate. in education at Penn.

“I am particularly drawn to Action Tank [way of] think about gun violence, and I’m a big supporter of having community organizations take the lead in tackling gun violence issues, ”he said.

A documentary by the South Jersey filmmaker Tim yingling called Feed Philly focuses on Action Tank’s contribution to tackling food insecurity in the city. During the film’s first public screening on August 20 in the courtyard of the Betsy Ross House in the old town, members of the group talked about what it means to be able to continue their service.

Action Tank “is exactly what I was looking for,” said James Morris, 28, who served in the Marine Corps, lives in Old City and is a project manager at an investment firm.

“There are a lot of different veterans organizations out there, and a lot of them are focused on helping other veterans, which is a big mission,” he said. “In Action Tank, veterans can use the skills we learned in the military and apply them here at home.”

In a previous interview, Navy veteran Mark Torres said his first action tank activity – helping provide meals at the Hub of Hope – confirmed his decision to join us.

“We had a mission. We were in sync and got into a really good rhythm, ”said Torres, 36, who lives at Glenside and works as a project manager. “It was a simple mission, serve and clean, but we all fell into our roles. I realized that I had missed this sense of belonging and connection since leaving the military.

Miclette said, “Action Tank is focused on community and improving the city. But it also creates a sense of purpose and a sense of connection. It brings the veterans together.


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Tybee and Georgia Southern Organizations Work to Create Black History Trail http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tybee-and-georgia-southern-organizations-work-to-create-black-history-trail/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tybee-and-georgia-southern-organizations-work-to-create-black-history-trail/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 23:06:00 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tybee-and-georgia-southern-organizations-work-to-create-black-history-trail/ TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) – Georgia Southern University and several Tybee Island organizations are working together to create a Black History Trail on the island. Their idea is to discover the stories, often unknown, of the black community of the island. It all comes from last summer when the island passed the race and fairness […]]]>

TYBEE ISLAND, Ga. (WTOC) – Georgia Southern University and several Tybee Island organizations are working together to create a Black History Trail on the island.

Their idea is to discover the stories, often unknown, of the black community of the island.

It all comes from last summer when the island passed the race and fairness resolution. Right now, the project is in its early stages, but one day those involved say everyone here, visitors and residents alike, will be familiar with the sometimes overlooked historic black community of Tybee.

The Tybee MLK organization, the Tybee Historical Society and the GSU are teaming up to uncover the stories of the black community that organizers say once thrived on the island.

Pat Leiby is the Tybee MLK community organizer. She says the project is focused on learning the location of the black community, so they can map it for everyone to see.

Leiby says what they have learned so far is that there used to be a black church near the north of Algiers Avenue, an oyster business and a black-owned inn to the south as well. than a nightclub.

“These stories need to be told. We need to understand history and hopefully understanding history will pave the way for us to better understand each other, ”said Leiby.

Leiby says they want members of the black community who have connections to the island or have stories to share, to contact them so they can hear their stories. If you have a story or know someone who does, you can email them at patricialeiby@gmail.com.

Copyright 2021 OMCC. All rights reserved.


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Colorado Springs Arts and Culture Organizations Receive Thousands of Dollars in Grants | Premium http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-arts-and-culture-organizations-receive-thousands-of-dollars-in-grants-premium/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-arts-and-culture-organizations-receive-thousands-of-dollars-in-grants-premium/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/colorado-springs-arts-and-culture-organizations-receive-thousands-of-dollars-in-grants-premium/ Five arts and culture organizations in Colorado Springs are thousands of dollars richer. Colorado Creative Industries has announced the recipients of its Colorado Creates Grants, a program that provides financial support to nonprofit cultural organizations and government agencies to help keep art in motion and create jobs in communities. Concrete Couch, a non-profit organization that […]]]>

Five arts and culture organizations in Colorado Springs are thousands of dollars richer.

Colorado Creative Industries has announced the recipients of its Colorado Creates Grants, a program that provides financial support to nonprofit cultural organizations and government agencies to help keep art in motion and create jobs in communities.

Concrete Couch, a non-profit organization that combines the strengths of children and adults to build community through creative projects and programs, received $ 7,500. The money will go towards free arts programming and Concrete Coyote, a thriving Hillside neighborhood park built and paid for by the community with free programs open to everyone.

“(It’s) awesome. It’s COVID – money is super tight,” said Steve Wood, Founder and Executive Director of Concrete Couch. “We’re trying to build this giant community art park. In a way, the timing is perfect with COVID – we can have classes and keep them safe. We’ve had 850 classes since the COVID hit. free; we have I didn’t make any money. “

Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center appoints new artistic director and producer for theater company

Colorado Creative Industries, a division of the state’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade, promotes, supports and develops the state’s creative industries to stimulate the economy, create jobs, and improve the quality of life.

The Green Box Arts Festival expands its offer and adds events in August

“We admire the strength and dedication of these hard-working individuals and groups who have remained engaged during one of the most difficult years our economy has faced,” said Margaret Hunt, director of Colorado Creative Industries. “The arts contribute significantly to our well-being and our meaning. from the community.

Colorado Creates 2022 Grant Recipients:

– Colorado Springs Children’s Choir, $ 8,500

– Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, $ 10,000

– Concrete sofa, $ 7,500

– Green Box Arts, $ 8,500

– Rocky Mountain Opera Theater, $ 6,500

Contact the author: 636-0270


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Glenville, youth sports organizations to discuss community land use http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/glenville-youth-sports-organizations-to-discuss-community-land-use/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/glenville-youth-sports-organizations-to-discuss-community-land-use/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 22:42:24 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/glenville-youth-sports-organizations-to-discuss-community-land-use/ Glenville Supervisor Chris Koetzle will meet with several youth sports organizations next week to discuss how the city can ensure equal use of city land, ensure costs associated with maintenance are properly shared and determine a better mechanism for planning the use of parks. The meeting stems from a letter the organizations received from the […]]]>

Glenville Supervisor Chris Koetzle will meet with several youth sports organizations next week to discuss how the city can ensure equal use of city land, ensure costs associated with maintenance are properly shared and determine a better mechanism for planning the use of parks.

The meeting stems from a letter the organizations received from the city on August 19, 2020, which said the city would move towards a more formalized method of renting space in parks.

Having said that, from next year we will be moving towards a new, more formalized fleet rental model that includes fixed fees and signed agreements, ”the letter said. “Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) will more clearly delineate the privileges and responsibilities of each entity, both the City as owner and the organization that leases the land. At that point, leagues may request a cost mitigation waiver based on grounds maintenance and improvements in lieu of certain park rental fees. ”

The idea that youth programs have to pay a fee, however, has raised concerns among organizations.

Rick Frederick, president of Tartan Youth Lacrosse, spoke at a budget forum on September 14 on the topic. He said all the costs would fall on the players and their families.

Tartan Youth Lacrosse is intended for Kindergarten to Grade 6 children in the Scotia-Glenville Central School District.

He said he saw all the fees as some sort of hidden tax and that the organization had always helped maintain the fields it uses in Indian Meadows and Maalwyck parks, including clearing the field and leveling it with soil and sowing grass seeds.

However, Frederick said relations between the organization and the city have always been good and he is interested to see what emerges from the discussion.

Susan Torelli, co-chair of Fifty FC Soccer, also said that any introduction of fees would fall on the people who participate in the program and the letter did not take into account what the organizations provided to the city when using the grounds. . .

“The letter from the city indicates that fee waivers are possible depending on the maintenance and improvements of the land, however, it does not recognize past investments and services provided to the community,” she said. in a press release sent by email. “Tthousands of volunteer hours are spent running community programs for the city’s youth. Many other surrounding municipalities fund and manage youth programs, but Glenville does not.

Fifty FC serves more than 600 children throughout the year with its recreation and travel programs, Torelli said.

“We are optimistic that our partnership will continue and hope the city recognizes the substantial benefits that Fifty FC and other community youth programs bring to city residents, and that they continue to let these organizations operate at no additional cost. required in the future. ,” she said.

Koetzle said the letter was not only 14 months old, but that he did not intend to include the fees for the fields in his 2022 budget. He said the letter was intended to indicate to organizations the need to discuss issues that have arisen as parks have become more popular and clubs have grown.

“We don’t do anything without talking to everyone,” Koetzle said.

These issues include efficiency with scheduling all groups who want to access the fields and making sure no one is left out of using a park, he said.

It also includes determining some kind of cost-sharing mechanism for field maintenance.

Journalist Shenandoah Brière can be reached at 518-478-3320 or [email protected]

More from The Daily Gazette:

Categories: News, Schenectady County


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Student organizations are active http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/student-organizations-are-active/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/student-organizations-are-active/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 06:11:27 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/student-organizations-are-active/ It’s a return to in-person classes, events and more for organizations that are part of student life. For many organizations, the temporary return to in-person classes and the loosening of mask mandates means they can pick up where they left off before the pandemic and plan their semesters’ events and activities for their respective organizations. […]]]>

It’s a return to in-person classes, events and more for organizations that are part of student life.

For many organizations, the temporary return to in-person classes and the loosening of mask mandates means they can pick up where they left off before the pandemic and plan their semesters’ events and activities for their respective organizations.

The Programming Activities Council (PAC) is responsible for many of the events held on campus and seems to have its hands full for the semester.

“Returning from last year, our main goal is to really engage students,” said CPC President Mattie Kolb.

Over the past year, PAC has helped organize smaller almost daily events for students to get out of during COVID-19; a challenge for its members. Although their annual spring concert has been canceled for the past two years as a precaution, they are looking to pick up the pace with their fall concert on September 11.

“We are super excited; we’re going to introduce Surfaces, ”Kolb said. “The content will be different from what we have seen in the past. Typically, students always vote for more of this kind of rap. So to bring that little more vibe, a little more chill music, it’s just going to be a different crowd.

PAC is also bringing back Pack the Stands, a halftime game show at certain sporting events. They’re also planning to bring back Pack the Pub, an event where students can hang out at a local bar – however, this one is still ongoing.

The Cultural Inclusion Council (CIC) is also returning this semester with positions of coordinator and deputy coordinator for each branch filled for the first time in years.

“This year we finally have a full CIC,” said Nayeli Hernandez, CIC communications manager. “At the moment, we are only focusing on building our alliances individually. “

CIC consists of the Black Student Alliance, the International Student Alliance, the Polynesian Ho’olokahi Alliance, the Latino Student Alliance, the Gender and Sexuality Alliance, and the Alliance Native American students.

The Native American Student Alliance (NASA) returned last semester after being inactive for a few years, and is looking to increase membership this semester.

Students of any identification can join any alliance they wish.

“You don’t have to be from that certain culture to attend any of the alliance meetings or be a member of anything, everyone is more than welcome,” Hernandez said.

One of the largest organizations on campus, the Associated Student Government (ASG) is also entering the semester looking for student opportunities.

“ASG’s plans for this semester are to continue building on the foundation that has been laid for us,” said ASG President Jay Shearrow.

Last year, the previous student administration navigated the pandemic and set the example that this year seems to follow.

“This year is uniquely important as it presents new opportunities to partner with a new university administration,” said Shearrow.

Former CMU president Tim Foster resigned in June, leaving the post to former vice president of student services John Marshall.

“It goes without saying that this year is unique due to the transition to a fully in-person environment. The definition of “normal” has changed, ”Shearrow said. “ASG plans to take the things we’ve learned from the pandemic and put them forward to build a more collaborative CMU. We challenge ASG members to become more involved in the student clubs and organizations we represent. We know we will serve more students by bringing ASG, clubs and organizations together in a collaborative effort.

ASG’s plans for the year include mental health and food insecurity initiatives through its Swipe Out Hunger program.

“ASG will also help students through this representation at the state level. Student [Aaron] Administrator Reed and I sit on advisory bodies that directly influence the state legislature, ”said Shearrow. “If the students have any comments or ideas on what they would like Administrator Reed and I to bring to the discussion during these sessions, we would love to hear them. “

Many other student life organizations including the club advisory board, sustainability board and many others are also navigating the interim return to campus life by keeping an eye on events, growth and more.


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Anti-hate organizations denounce Cobb County school board for hate speech in schools http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/anti-hate-organizations-denounce-cobb-county-school-board-for-hate-speech-in-schools/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/anti-hate-organizations-denounce-cobb-county-school-board-for-hate-speech-in-schools/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 03:26:21 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/anti-hate-organizations-denounce-cobb-county-school-board-for-hate-speech-in-schools/ Frustration with Cobb Schools for exposing hate speech Some parents are upset with the Cobb County School District for what they call an inadequate response to recent hate speech. Their complaints come after swastikas and other Nazi-associated graffiti were found in two schools. MARIETTA, Georgia. – Georgia’s second-largest school district is currently under fire. Members […]]]>

Georgia’s second-largest school district is currently under fire.

Members of the Jewish community are frustrated with the response from the Cobb County School Board. Anti-Semitic graffiti found in two high schools.

They call the board response inadequate.

A district spokesperson said the council chairman has publicly condemned the incidents on numerous occasions.

In a new statement to FOX 5 News, the board continued to condemn hate speech and anti-Semitism, but the chairman of the Atlanta Initiative Against Anti-Semitism said this new response was not still not sufficient.

“It doesn’t really deal with the seriousness of the swastikas and the praise of Hitler in two schools in the district in the space of a week,” said Lauren Menis, chair of the Atlanta Initiative Against Anti-Semitism. .

FOX 5 previously reported disturbing school officials recently found graffiti at Pope and Lassiter High Schools.

Someone drew anti-Semitic symbols and language in the toilets of both schools.

“My reaction to both incidents was what it’s usually like ‘oh my gosh. Here we go again, ”Menis said.

The incidents both occurred during major Jewish holidays.

“We are not going to sit down and watch hate happen in their schools. We are going to fix it,” Menis said.

She said her organization and community members were initially upset that the school board did not immediately label the acts as anti-Semitism.

Now that the council has done so, she has said they want the district to provide students and staff with educational and anti-hate programs to prevent this type of incident from happening again.

“These need to be taken seriously and also used as a way to have a good time for learning that doesn’t happen at all,” she said.

On Monday, a district spokesperson sent us the following statement regarding the incidents:

“Speaking on behalf of the chairman of the board and council, the district continues to condemn the recent disturbing trend in social media involving hate speech, anti-Semitic references and abuse of school property. This continues to be unacceptable. and to entertain our teachers and students. ability to focus on teaching and learning. Our principals have and are engaging with students, teachers, parents and community members on way to prevent harmful and illegal behavior from occurring.There is zero tolerance for actions that harm individual students, groups of people or the school building, and all applicable district policies and laws will be We encourage families to talk to their students about the impacts of inappropriate and dangerous trends on social media. Parents, students or staff can report r security concerns at Tipline district by call, text or email. “

Menis said “you can’t group ‘Heil Hitler’ and swastikas together with the other things they group them with.”

AIAAS created this petition demanding that the board take immediate action against anti-Semitism in their schools.

The organization along with the Anti-Defamation League, American Jewish Committee and Union of Jewish Students plan to attend Thursday’s board meeting to share their concerns with district leaders.

“When a community is targeted, we are all at risk,” Menis explained.

FOX 5 asked the district spokesperson if he had identified the person responsible for the vandalism in the schools, but he did not answer this question.

WATCH: FOX 5 Atlanta live news coverage

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A journey through organizational cyber resilience Part 2: Business continuity http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/a-journey-through-organizational-cyber-resilience-part-2-business-continuity/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/a-journey-through-organizational-cyber-resilience-part-2-business-continuity/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 16:00:50 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/a-journey-through-organizational-cyber-resilience-part-2-business-continuity/ Keeping a business up and running during a problem requires the right people for the job. When it comes to cyber resilience in tough times, a lot of things boil down to the human factor. We focused on this in the first article in this series, but it also makes a big difference for the […]]]>

Keeping a business up and running during a problem requires the right people for the job. When it comes to cyber resilience in tough times, a lot of things boil down to the human factor. We focused on this in the first article in this series, but it also makes a big difference for the second topic: business continuity. So how do you make sure your business processes and functions keep running during an outage?

Where cyber resilience meets business decisions

First of all, what is a business function? Information security managers and staff need to know because it is important that they are comfortable with the language of business. It’s just part of building and running a strong cybersecurity program. Part of this language includes knowing the nuances between business continuity, disaster recovery and ongoing operations. The IBM System Storage Business Continuity: Planning Guide Part 1 provides some very useful tips in section 1.1 showing these nuances. For work, you may need to be able to explain them. They could come in handy when you start to seek internal support for your cyber resilience efforts.

Essentially, a business function is the set of tasks that a service performs to produce a result. This is a very basic explanation, different for different jobs. But for our purposes, this is enough. A business process is often a set of chained tasks performed by people or equipment to produce a service or product.

Together with disaster recovery and other resilience strategies, good business continuity planning helps identify stakeholders. It also helps better position your group to respond to incidents that could impact your finances, brand, reputation and value.

Therefore, whatever cybersecurity framework you use, business continuity plays a key role. After all, you need to be fully aware of the services and products your business offers. In other words, while it’s your job to keep the network running and the data close at hand, it’s a good idea to know Why you have to do this. The answer is that you must continue to provide the service or product during an interruption.

Plans, plans and more plans for cyber resilience

If you don’t know where to start when it comes to the business continuity game, two great resources are NIST 800-34 Emergency Planning Guide for Federal Information Systems and ISO 22301: 2019. NIST 800-34 is very useful. It clarifies the differences between various distinct, but closely related, shots. These include business continuity plans, business continuity plans, crisis communication plans and more visible at the link level.

Maybe your organization can develop and execute all of the above plans. If so, your cyber-resilience posture is probably pretty strong, with the caveat: plans without testing are just dust-gathering documents. Therefore, you need to test your plans. And testing without concern for safety or culture means all you do is tick the boxes. Therefore, remember that plans are only the first step.

Process contingency strategies

Over the past year and a half, some of us have been fortunate enough to work from home. This is a unique example of a process contingency strategy. The business process has gone remotely due to an interruption.

Below are some of the more common process contingency strategies. Choosing the one that’s right for you and your business is a function of criticality, practicality, and risk tolerance.

Process transfer: As the name suggests, the process is transferred to another person or to another piece of equipment. You can transfer it internally, but don’t rule out a managed service provider either. This is where formal contracts and memoranda of understanding should already be in place.

Also, pro tip here: Along the cyber resilience journey, if you are relying on a third party, make sure you know what your priority is. Remember that an outage can impact more parties than you, and the third party you rely on can support many more. Any roadmap development for cyber resilience requires that you know what your resources are. The functions and service offerings of third parties fall into this category.

Alternative site: The process is carried out at another location. It should be noted in this case that another site may or may not be owned and operated by your organization. Again, you need to be aware of what your contractual agreements are with third parties.

Remote work: There is a nuanced difference here between the alternative site and remote work. The perfect example for many is working from home. After all, you’re not really working on another site in this case.

Follow the sun: You’ll see this strategy for organizations that normally have a global footprint. This does not apply to all businesses, of course. But it is useful for the resources of large companies spread around the world. In the most basic form, the sun tracking model means that offices in different time zones pass processes between them. It sounds very convenient in theory, but in practice it can be a bit more difficult. After all, different regions need to manage not only their local processes, but also those of the region that has been disrupted. This may require additional coffee makers.

Depending on your business model, you may be able to come up with additional contingency strategies for your processes, but practicality should be part of your decision making. A small business, for example, may not be able to transfer a process because it has limited staff. This is where succession planning comes in. But what you should start to notice is that there are a lot of pieces moving here and more to come on the cyber resilience journey.

Putting the pieces of the cyber resilience puzzle together

In the next article in this series, we’ll talk about disaster recovery and identifying interdependencies. Disaster recovery is an interesting topic because of the cloud. In short, much of the literature and practice surrounding disaster recovery was written in the days of data centers and colocation sites. So stop by next time to see how the cloud is changing the disaster recovery discussion.


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Tallahassee organizations plan immunization awareness programs http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tallahassee-organizations-plan-immunization-awareness-programs/ http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tallahassee-organizations-plan-immunization-awareness-programs/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 04:11:17 +0000 http://ruthdiltsdesign.com/tallahassee-organizations-plan-immunization-awareness-programs/ TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) – Keisha Brown, who heads Brain Building Consulting, is taking a big step forward in the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. “We’re just trying to mitigate the spread of COVID,” Brown said. Brain Building Consulting works with daycares to formulate the best learning plans for the centers they work with. Now they will […]]]>

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (WTXL) – Keisha Brown, who heads Brain Building Consulting, is taking a big step forward in the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.

“We’re just trying to mitigate the spread of COVID,” Brown said.

Brain Building Consulting works with daycares to formulate the best learning plans for the centers they work with.

Now they will work with these daycares to provide vaccines and information to parents who pick up their children at the end of the day.

For centers that participate, Brown says there will be incentives.

“The incentives are monetary,” Brown said. “Each center will be offered a monetary donation to the center for billing school supplies.”

Each center could receive up to $ 300.

The money from Brain Building is part of a $ 50,000 outreach grant from the Tallahassee-Leon County Coronavirus Vaccination Education and Community Engagement Working Group that was awarded to 10 organizations.

Also using the money, ALARM International Church, they say instead of handing out vaccines, they will give vaccine information at one of Florida A&M’s football hatchbacks.

Kevin Alford of ALARM International says they are focusing on minority communities who may be more hesitant to receive the vaccine.

“It is important that we not only take leadership in spiritual matters, but also in matters that deal with a person’s daily life,” said Peters.

With COVID-19 cases declining statewide, organizations hope their work to distribute the vaccine and fight disinformation will help save lives across the state and country.

“And that is why it is important and vital that we are that face and that voice in the community.”


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