Australians share old phrases the kids of 2021 don’t understand

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From ‘opening the window’ to ‘leaving the internet’: the everyday phrases of the 1990s the kids of 2021 will never understand

  • Australians share funny old phrases the kids of 2021 will never understand
  • Hundreds of people were invited to share their most memorable lines while growing up
  • One of the most frequently mentioned was “ remember to rewind the tape ”
  • Other phrases include “ close window ” and “ quit the Internet ”

Australians took a trip down memory lane after listing the fun old phrases the kids of 2021 will never understand – including ‘close the window’, ‘quit the internet’ and ‘I’m out of my credit ”.

Hundreds of people were invited to share their most memorable lines that grew up in the 90s and early 2000s.

“What’s a phrase that kids these days wouldn’t understand at all?” I’m going to start. “Get off the internet, I have to use the phone,” one mother wrote in a Facebook group.

One of the most frequently mentioned was “don’t forget to rewind the tape” – a reminder to rent video to customers to rewind VHS tapes before sending them back.

Dozens of people remember the phrase ‘roll down the window’ in cars, which once featured handles on each door so people could open or close windows the old-fashioned way by hand (stock image )

Revealed: the old phrases the kids of 2021 will never understand

Wind at the bottom / top of the window: To open or close a car window manually using a handle

Quit the Internet to be able to use the phone: Dial-up was a form of Internet access that used the telephone line to create an Internet connection

I have no more credits: Instead of today’s stuck unlimited phone contracts, many used to top up their phones once they ran out of credit.

I need a pen. The cassette player chewed on my cassette again: A dilemma people faced when their tapes got stuck in their VCRs

Turn the cassette over to side B: Listeners had to turn over their tapes after side A had finished playing on their cassette player

Remember to rewind the tape: A video rental reminder to customers to rewind VHS tapes before returning them

Here’s 40 cents, call when you’re ready to be picked up: Before cellphones, people made calls from a phone booth

Just need to post a letter to my correspondent: Long before email and social media, people wrote handwritten letters to their pen pals

Do you want the wooden spoon ?: Parents once disciplined their children by hitting them with a wooden spoon

Quick quick, it’s back: People used to take a quick break during commercials between TV shows or movies

In an entertaining thread, many people recalled that the phrase “get up and change the channel” was commonly used in their homes.

Long before remotes, Bluetooth, and WiFi, people had to leave their couches and change channels manually using the buttons on the television.

Families would take turns getting up to change channels, while most parents or older siblings would often have the younger member do it for them.

“Get up and go change the channel on the TV. I remember it was my job, ” one recalled, while another added, “ It’s not my turn to change channels. ”

One of the most commonly mentioned was `` remember to rewind the tape '' - a video rental reminder for customers to rewind VHS tapes before sending them back.

One of the most commonly mentioned was “ remember to rewind the tape ” – a video rental reminder for customers to rewind VHS tapes before sending them back.

Another memory was waking up every Saturday morning to record a favorite song played on TV music video programs like Video Hits and Rage.

“I’ll do it in a minute mom, I’m waiting for the end of this announcement to be able to record this song”, recalls a woman.

Another said, ‘Oh my God, you just ruined my recording of this song! You made me miss the beginning of this song! Oh no, the tape ran out before the end of this song! I’ll have to wait until next Saturday to record this Rage song.

While a mom added: ‘Rewinding a tape so you can listen to your awesome mix tape again … not to mention the pain of trying to mute the radio host before you start speaking at the end. of the song. ”

Dozens of people remember the phrase “ roll up the window ” or “ roll up the window ” in cars, which once featured handles on every door so people could open or close their windows from the outside. old in hand.

Life before WiFi was very different, with many remembering the days when they were told to `` quit the internet '' so that their parents or siblings could use the phone.  Dial-up was a form of Internet access that uses the telephone line to create an Internet connection (stock image)

Life before WiFi was very different, with many remembering the days when they were told to “ quit the internet ” so that their parents or siblings could use the phone. Dial-up was a form of Internet access that uses the telephone line to create an Internet connection (stock image)

When mobile phones were introduced in the 90s and 2000s, many remembered using the 'I'm out of credit' excuse when you couldn't answer calls or texts (stock image)

When mobile phones were introduced in the 90s and 2000s, many remembered using the ‘I’m out of credit’ excuse when you couldn’t answer calls or texts (stock image)

Life before WiFi was very different, with many remembering the days when they were told to “ quit the internet ” so that their parents or siblings could use the phone.

Dial-up was a form of Internet access that used the telephone line to create an Internet connection.

“I was on call when Bri was on the line. She continued to pick up the phone but continued to reconnect, ” one woman recalls.

Children growing up in the ’80s and’ 90s remember their parents giving them change so they could use it later to call them from a phone booth.

“ Here’s 40 cents, call when you’re ready to be picked up, ” one woman recalled, while another joked, “ Here’s 30 cents, call someone who cares. ”

And one of them remembered, “ Take a dime and go down to the phone booth to ring big … now it’s old. ”

And when cell phones were first introduced in the 90s and 2000s, many remembered using the “I’m out of credit” excuse when you couldn’t answer calls or texts.

Instead of today’s stuck unlimited phone contracts, many used to manually top up their phones once they ran out of credit.

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